Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 86 items for

  • Author or Editor: Douglas H. Clements x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Douglas H. Clements

Edited by Michael T. Battista

Why is it that students often do not learn what they are taught? On what do they base their thinking? What can we as teachers do to help them construct accurate and robust understandings?

Restricted access

Edited by Douglas H. Clements, Peter Kloosterman and Janet Parker

Restricted access

Douglas H. Clements

Edited by John Van de Walle

Restricted access

Edited by Douglas H. Clements, Peter Kloosterman and Janet Parker

Restricted access

Michael T. Battista and Douglas H. Clements

Geometry is an essential part of mathematics. Unfortunately, according to evaluations of mathematics learning, such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), students are failing to understand basic geometric concepts and are failing to develop adequate geometric problem-solving skills (Carpenter et al. 1980; Fey et al. 1984; Kouba et al. 1988). This poor performance is due, in part, to the current elementary school geometry curriculum, which focuses on recognizing and naming geometric shapes and learning to write the proper symbolism for simple geometric concepts (cf. Carpenter et al. [1980]; Flanders [1987]). In contrast, we believe that elementary geometry should be the study of objects, motions, and relationships in a spatial environment (Clements and Battista [1986]; cf. Trafton and LeBlanc [1973]). First experiences with geometry should emphasize informal study of physical shapes and their properties and have as their primary goal the development of students' intuition and knowledge about their spatial environment. Subsequent experiences should involve analyzing and abstracting geometric concepts and relationships in increasingly formal settings.

Restricted access

Janka Szilágyi, Douglas H. Clements and Julie Sarama

This study investigated the development of length measurement ideas in students from prekindergarten through 2nd grade. The main purpose was to evaluate and elaborate the developmental progression, or levels of thinking, of a hypothesized learning trajectory for length measurement to ensure that the sequence of levels of thinking is consistent with observed behaviors of most young children. The findings generally validate the developmental progression, including the tasks and the mental actions on objects that define each level, with several elaborations of the levels of thinking and minor modifications of the levels themselves.

Restricted access

Douglas H. Clements and Leroy G. Callahan

Activitie with number card. can provide a wide variety of exploratory experiences in mathematics. In addition to being inexpensive and easy to make, the e materials offer young children the opportunity to explore numbers without the fru tration of writing them. Since the cards can be moved or rearranged, solutions can be changed easily. Children who arc not confident in mathematics may find this attribute particularly attractive. Their anxiety about having teacher or peers see mistake may be lessened.

Restricted access

Douglas H. Clements and Leroy G. Callahan

Extended discussion can be found in the literature regarding the appropriateness or inappropriateness, of teaching counting and other number kill to pre chool and kindergarten children.

Restricted access

Michael T. Battista

Edited by Douglas H. Clements

In reality, no one can teach mathematics. Effective teachers are those who can stimulate students to learn mathematics. Educational research offers compelling evidence that students learn mathematics well only when they construct their own mathematical understanding (MSEB and National Research Council 1989, 58).

Restricted access

Michael T. Battista and Douglas H. Clements

The present study extends previous research in this area by providing a more elaborate and theoretical description of students' solution strategies and errors in dealing with 3-D cube arrays. It describes several cognitive constructions and operations that seem to be required for students to conceptualize and enumerate the cubes in such arrays, exploring in depth general cognitive operations such as coordination, integration, and “structuring” as they are manifested in a spatial context. It describes how, in dealing with 3-D rectangular arrays, students' spatial thinking is related to their enumeration strategies. The findings suggest that students' initial conception of a 3-D rectangular array of cubes is as an uncoordinated set of faces. Eventually, as students become capable of coordinating views, they see the array as space filling and strive to restructure it as such. Those who complete a global restructuring of the array use layering strategies. Those in transition use strategies that indicate that their restructuring is local rather than global. Finally, the data suggest that many students are unable to enumerate the cubes in a 3-D array because they cannot coordinate the separate views of the array and integrate them to construct one coherent mental model of the array.