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Margaret S. Smith and Mary Kay Stein

Abstract

Five practices provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., CCSSM and Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

Long Description

5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions, 2nd edition, provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and NCTM’s Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

What’s new?

  • Guidance on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Details on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Expanded lesson planning discussion

Relevant for K – grade 12 mathematics teachers and the coaches, teacher educators, professional developers, and supervisors that support them.

Restricted access

Margaret S. Smith and Mary Kay Stein

Abstract

Five practices provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., CCSSM and Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

Long Description

5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions, 2nd edition, provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and NCTM’s Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

What’s new?

  • Guidance on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Details on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Expanded lesson planning discussion

Relevant for K – grade 12 mathematics teachers and the coaches, teacher educators, professional developers, and supervisors that support them.

Restricted access

Margaret S. Smith and Mary Kay Stein

Abstract

Five practices provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., CCSSM and Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

Long Description

5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions, 2nd edition, provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and NCTM’s Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

What’s new?

  • Guidance on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Details on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Expanded lesson planning discussion

Relevant for K – grade 12 mathematics teachers and the coaches, teacher educators, professional developers, and supervisors that support them.

Restricted access

Margaret S. Smith and Mary Kay Stein

Abstract

Five practices provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., CCSSM and Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

Long Description

5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions, 2nd edition, provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and NCTM’s Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

What’s new?

  • Guidance on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Details on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Expanded lesson planning discussion

Relevant for K – grade 12 mathematics teachers and the coaches, teacher educators, professional developers, and supervisors that support them.

Restricted access

Margaret S. Smith and Mary Kay Stein

Abstract

Five practices provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., CCSSM and Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

Long Description

5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions, 2nd edition, provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and NCTM’s Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

What’s new?

  • Guidance on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Details on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Expanded lesson planning discussion

Relevant for K – grade 12 mathematics teachers and the coaches, teacher educators, professional developers, and supervisors that support them.

Restricted access

Margaret S. Smith and Mary Kay Stein

Abstract

Five practices provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., CCSSM and Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

Long Description

5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions, 2nd edition, provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and NCTM’s Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

What’s new?

  • Guidance on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Details on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Expanded lesson planning discussion

Relevant for K – grade 12 mathematics teachers and the coaches, teacher educators, professional developers, and supervisors that support them.

Restricted access

Margaret S. Smith and Mary Kay Stein

Abstract

Five practices provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., CCSSM and Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

Long Description

5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions, 2nd edition, provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and NCTM’s Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

What’s new?

  • Guidance on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Details on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Expanded lesson planning discussion

Relevant for K – grade 12 mathematics teachers and the coaches, teacher educators, professional developers, and supervisors that support them.

Restricted access

Margaret S. Smith and Mary Kay Stein

Abstract

Five practices provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., CCSSM and Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

Long Description

5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions, 2nd edition, provides a model for facilitating discussions in mathematics classrooms based on the thinking of students. The model—anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing and connecting—focuses on planning prior to the lesson and, in so doing, limits the amount of improvisation required during the lesson. This new edition is situated within current educational context (e.g., Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and NCTM’s Principles to Actions) and offers details on how to plan for and engage students in K – grade 12 classrooms in discussions that advance the learning of all students in the classroom. Included are a detailed lesson plan, lesson planning protocol, completed monitoring chart, and a list of task resources.

What’s new?

  • Guidance on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Details on what is involved in anticipating, including elaboration on assessing and advancing questions
  • Expanded lesson planning discussion

Relevant for K – grade 12 mathematics teachers and the coaches, teacher educators, professional developers, and supervisors that support them.

Restricted access

Mary Kay Stein and Margaret Schwan Smith

According to the professional Standards for Teaching Mathematics (NCTM 1991), a primary factor in teachers' professional growth is the extent to which they “reflect on learning and teaching individually and with colleagues” (p. 168). Reflecting on their classroom experiences is a way to make teachers aware of how they teach (Hart et al. 1992) and how their students are thriving within the learning environment that has been provided. Although all teachers think informally about their classroom experiences, cultivating a habit of systematic and deliberate reflection may hold the key to improving one's teaching as well as to sustaining lifelong professional development.

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Margaret Schwan Smith and Mary Kay Stein

What features of a mathematics classroom really make a difference in how students come to view mathematics and what they ultimately learn? Is it whether students are working in small groups? Is it whether students are using manipulalives? Is it the nature of the mathematical tasks that are given to students? Research conducted in the QUASAR project, a five-year study of mathematics education reform in urban middle schools (Silver and Stein 1996). offers some insight into these questions. From 1990 through 1995, data were collected about many aspects of reform teaching, including the use of small groups; the tool that were available for student use, for example, manipulatives and calculators; and the nature of the mathematics tasks. A major finding of this research to date, as described in the article by Stein and Smith in the January 1998 issue of Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, is that the highest learning gains on a mathematicsperformance assessment were related to the extent to which tasks were et up and implemented in ways that engaged students in high levels of cognitive thinking and reasoning (Stein and Lane 1996). This finding supports the position that the nature of the tasks to which students are exposed detennines what students learn (NCTM 1991), and it also leads to many questions that should be considered by middle school teachers.