Browse

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Representations x
  • Grades 9-12 x
  • Communication x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Erik Jacobson

Table representations of functions allow students to compare rows as well as values in the same row.

Restricted access

S. Asli Özgün-Koca, Michael Todd Edwards, and Michael Meagher

The Spaghetti Sine Curves activity, which uses GeoGebra applets to enhance student learning, illustrates how technology supports effective use of physical materials.

Restricted access

Amy F. Hillen and LuAnn Malik

A card-sorting task can help students extend their understanding of functions and functional relationships.

Restricted access

Mark W. Ellis and Janet L. Bryson

Sitting in the back of Ms. Corey's sixthgrade mathematics class, I enjoyed seeing students enthusiastically demonstrate their understanding of absolute value. On the giant number line on the classroom floor, they counted the steps that they needed to take to get back to zero. The old definition of absolute value of a number as its distance from zero—learned by students and teachers of the previous generation—has long ago been replaced with this algebraic statement: |x| = x if x ≤ 0 or − x if x < 0. The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. However, I cannot remember students attacking the task with enthusiasm or having any understanding beyond “make the inside positive.”