Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • Representations x
  • Communication x
Clear All
Full access

S. Asli Özgün-Koca and Matt Enlow

In this month's Growing Problem Solvers, we focused on supporting students' understanding of congruence and similarity through rigid motions and transformations. Initial understandings of congruence and similarity begin in first grade as students work with shapes in different perspectives and orientations and reflect on similarities and differences.

Full access

Steve Ingrassia and Molly Rawding

Problems to Ponder provides 28 varied, classroom-ready mathematics problems that span grades PK-12, arranged in order of grade band. Links to the problem answers are available in this department.

Restricted access

Erik Jacobson

Table representations of functions allow students to compare rows as well as values in the same row.

Restricted access

S. Asli Özgün-Koca, Michael Todd Edwards and Michael Meagher

The Spaghetti Sine Curves activity, which uses GeoGebra applets to enhance student learning, illustrates how technology supports effective use of physical materials.

Restricted access

Wendy P. Ruchti and Cory A. Bennett

Solutions coupled with drawings can illustrate students' understandings or misunderstandings, particularly in the area of proportional reasoning.

Restricted access

Amy F. Hillen and LuAnn Malik

A card-sorting task can help students extend their understanding of functions and functional relationships.

Restricted access

Rheta N. Rubenstein and Denisse R. Thompson

A tool used in reading theory is adapted to help mathematics teachers ask good questions that help students interpret displays of information.

Restricted access

Michael J. Bossé and Kwaku Adu-Gyamfi

A geometry course for teachers—easily adaptable to a high school geometry class—integrates technology, reasoning, communication, collaboration, reading, writing, and multiple representations.

Restricted access

Derek A. Stiffler

Restricted access

Beth Cory and Ken W. Smith

Through these calculus activities, students reach an understanding of the formal limit concept in a way that enables them to construct the formal symbolic definition on their own.