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Micah S. Stohlmann

An escape room can be a great way for students to apply and practice mathematics they have learned. This article describes the development and implementation of a mathematical escape room with important principles to incorporate in escape rooms to help students persevere in problem solving.

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J. Matt Switzer

tudents often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and my students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an inequality, students may lack a deep understanding of the relationship between the inequality and its graph. Hiebert and Carpenter (1992) stated that mathematics is understood “if its mental representation is part of a network of representations” and that the “degree of understanding is determined by the number and strength of the connections” (p. 67). I therefore developed an activity that allows students to explore the graphs of inequalities not presented as lines in slope-intercept form, thereby making connections between pairs of expressions, ordered pairs, and the points on a graph representing equations and inequalities.

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Victor Mateas

Economics can be an avenue for teaching such algebra concepts as graphing curves, writing linear equations, solving systems of equations, and shifting graphs.

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Courtney R. Nagle and Deborah Moore-Russo

Students must be able to relate many representations of slope to form an integrated understanding of the concept.

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Kimberly M. Lilienthal

Exploring airport traffic, usage, hours of operation, and security statistics are all ways to model and bring relevance to math. Students soar while exploring the mathematics of aircraft: dimensions, cargo, fuel, and passenger capacity. Comparing two airports or aircraft would be valuable ways to extend their mathematical journey.

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Amy F. Hillen and LuAnn Malik

A card-sorting task can help students extend their understanding of functions and functional relationships.

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Melissa A. Stoner, Kristin T. Stuby and Susan Szczepanski

By implementing high-impact activities, such as designing a school and a skate park, mathematical thinking can be linked to the engineering design process.

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Sheldon P. Gordon

We tell students that mathematical errors should be avoided, but understanding errors is an important tool in developing numerical methods.

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Patricia Wallace-Gomez

When teaching slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines, I want students to have a visual image of the lines, not just memorize a formula. A simple exercise with parallel lines can get the message across.