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Matt B. Roscoe and Joe Zephyrs

Pull on the threads of congruence and similarity in a series of lessons that explores transformational geometry.

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Jennifer R. Brown

Set sail to explore powerful ways to use anchor charts in mathematics teaching and learning.

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Claudia R. Burgess

This geometry lesson uses the work of abstract artist Wassily Kandinsky as a springboard and is intended to promote the conceptual understanding of mathematics through problem solving, group cooperation, mathematical negotiations, and dialogue.

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Jordan T. Hede and Jonathan D. Bostic

See how sixth-grade students design and create quilt squares for this geometry project.

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Terri L. Kurz

People who lay tile for a living use mathematics every day to decide how much tile, grout, and other supplies are required to complete each job. Measurement and geometry are an integral part of designing tile patterns. Collections of short activities focus on a monthly theme that includes four activities each for grade bands K–2, 3–4, and 5–6 and aims for an inquiry or problem-solving orientation.

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Taajah Felder Witherspoon

Observe fourth graders' thinking in action as they connect the multiplication of whole numbers to arrays.

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Amy Noelle Parks and Diana Chang Blom

Capitalize on opportunities for mathematical concepts to emerge in common preschool contexts, such as doll corners and block centers.

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Elaine Cerrato Fisher, George Roy and Charles (Andy) Reeves

Be inspired by a formerly timid third grader who now confidently conveys a new understanding of numbers, patterns, and their relationships as functions.

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Signe E. Kastberg and R. Scott Frye

How do classroom behavioral expectations support the development of students' mathematical reasoning? A sixth-grade teacher and his students developed this example while discussing a ratio comparison problem.

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Rina Zazkis, Ilya Sinitsky and Roza Leikin

A familiar relationship—the derivative of the area of a circle equals its circumference—is extended to other shapes and solids.