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Sherry L. Bair and JoAnn Cady

Solutions to a November 2013 Solve It problem are discussed, and the procedures used with problem solving are explored.

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Erik Jacobson

Table representations of functions allow students to compare rows as well as values in the same row.

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Kelley Rudy

This department showcases students' in-depth thinking and work on previously published problems. The December 2012/January 2013 hands-on exploration of the history of chewing gum appeals to a wide range of learners. It was a perfect followup to a multiplication unit that a third-grade class in Pennsylvania had just studied.

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Sonali Raje, Michael Krach, and Gail Kaplan

Stereochemistry and three-dimensional analysis constitute significant parts of this student activity.

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Kasi C. Allen

A student question and the process it generates demonstrate the importance of student-initiated tasks in implementing the SMP in the Common Core Standards.

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Erin R. Moss

A good problem can capture students' curiosity and can serve many functions in the elementary school classroom: to introduce specific concepts the teacher can build on once students recognize the need for additional mathematics or to help students see where to apply already-learned concepts. We encourage teachers to use the monthly problem in their own classrooms and report solutions, strategies, reflections, and misconceptions to the journal audience.

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Jessica S. Cohen

Use strip diagrams to model and solve problems requiring proportional reasoning.

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Kimberly M. Lilienthal

Exploring airport traffic, usage, hours of operation, and security statistics are all ways to model and bring relevance to math. Students soar while exploring the mathematics of aircraft: dimensions, cargo, fuel, and passenger capacity. Comparing two airports or aircraft would be valuable ways to extend their mathematical journey.

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James A. Preston

A good problem can capture students' curiosity and can serve many functions in the elementary school classroom: to introduce specific concepts the teacher can build on once students recognize the need for additional mathematics or to help students see where to apply already-learned concepts. We encourage teachers to use the monthly problem in their own classrooms and report solutions, strategies, reflections, and misconceptions to the journal audience.

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Ron Lancaster

Students analyze items from the media to answer mathematical questions related to the article. This month features two news clips on a lottery winner; the mathematics involved includes probability and combinatorics and some locus problems.