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Derek A. Williams, Kelly Fulton, Travis Silver, and Alec Nehring

A two-day lesson on taxicab geometry introduces high school students to a unit on proof.

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Marina Goodman

Bridge the digital divide by teaching students a useful technological skill while enhancing mathematics instruction focused on real-life matrix applications.

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Deanna Pecaski McLennan

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Amanda K. Riske, Catherine E. Cullicott, Amanda Mohammad Mirzaei, Amanda Jansen, and James Middleton

We introduce the Into Math Graph tool, which students use to graph how “into" mathematics they are over time. Using this tool can help teachers foster conversations with students and design experiences that focus on engagement from the student’s perspective.

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Micah S. Stohlmann

An escape room can be a great way for students to apply and practice mathematics they have learned. This article describes the development and implementation of a mathematical escape room with important principles to incorporate in escape rooms to help students persevere in problem solving.

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Amanda Milewski and Daniel Frohardt

Few high school students associate mathematics with playfulness. In this paper, we offer a series of lessons focused on the underlying algebraic structures of the Rubik's Cube. The Rubik's Cube offers students an interesting space to enjoy the playful side of mathematics, while appreciating mathematics otherwise lost in routine experiences.

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Micah S. Stohlmann

Dude Perfect has one of the most popular YouTube channels in the United States. An example mathematical activity connected to a Dude Perfect video is described along with the incorporation of assessing and advancing questions.

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Christina Lundberg

My favorite lesson is based on a problem my geometry students encounter. When we study similar triangles, students use indirect measurement to determine the height of an object.

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Michael Weiss

One of the central components of high school algebra is the study of quadratic functions and equations. The Common Core State Standards (CCSSI 2010) for Mathematics states that students should learn to solve quadratic equations through a variety of methods (CCSSM A-REI.4b) and use the information learned from those methods to sketch the graphs of quadratic (and other polynomial) functions (CCSSM A-APR.3). More specifically, students learn to graph a quadratic function by doing some combination of the following:

  • Locating its zeros (x-intercepts)

  • Locating its y-intercept

  • Locating its vertex and axis of symmetry

  • Plotting additional points, as needed

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Yating Liu and Mary C. Enderson

Similar assumptions seem to give rise to conflicting answers when students approach probability questions differently.