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Scott G. Smith

Suggestions for incorporating calculator programming into the mathematics curriculum.

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Alfinio Flores

The striking results of this coin-tossing simulation help students understand the law of large numbers.

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Catherine Tabor

A programming activity helps students give meaning to the abstract concept of slope.

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Alison L. Mall and Mike Risinger

Our favorite lesson, an interactive experiment that models exponential decay, launches with a loud dice roll. This exploration engages students in lively data collection that motivates interest in key components of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: functions, modeling, and statistics and probability (CCSSI 2010).

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Jon D. Davis

Using technology to explore the coefficients of a quadratic equation leads to an unexpected result.

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Bruce Frahm

Four graphing calculator games to entice your students to learn mathematics.

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Jonathan D. Baker

The outcome distribution for rolling a single die is horizontal; for rolling a pair of dice it is a triangle. What happens when more than two dice are rolled? What happens when the die has other than six sides? These and other questions are answered in an accessible and useful treatise.

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Michael Dempsey

When understood and applied appropriately, mathematics is both beautiful and powerful. As a result, students are sometimes tempted to extend that power beyond appropriate limits. In teaching statistics at both the high school and college level, I have found that one of students' biggest struggles is applying their understanding of probability to make appropriate inferences.

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Bryan C. Dorner

Students who have grown up with computers and calculators may take these tools' capabilities for granted, but I find something magical about entering arbitrary values and computing transcendental functions such as the sine and cosine with the press of a button. Although the calculator operates mysteriously, students generally trust technology implicitly. However, beginning trigonometry students can compute the sine and cosine of any angle to any desired degree of precision using only simple geometry and a calculator with a square root key.

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Sarah D. Ledford, Mary L. Garner and Angela L. Teachey

Interesting solutions and ideas emerge when preservice and in-service teachers are asked a traditional algebra question in new ways.