Browse

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 26,365 items

Restricted access

Dawn M. Woods and Anne Garrison Wilhelm

This study investigates how the exploration phase of the teacher learning cycle provides 11 novice mathematics teachers with the opportunity to learn about the high-leverage practice of launching a complex task. Findings suggest that the exploration phase of the teacher learning cycle provides novice teachers with opportunities to reflect on how to launch a complex task within the context of their own instructional practice. Because of this opportunity to deeply consider the pedagogical resource and reflect on it, novice teachers’ instructional visions were a filter through which they interpreted key instructional strategies offered up during the exploration phase of the teacher learning cycle. Further, the authors discuss three key takeaways for teacher educators who are attempting to implement the teacher learning cycle into their teacher education coursework.

Restricted access

Maci C. Nelson

As educators, we can attest to how students are the best litmus test for the relevance of our subject matter. To close the gap between an abstract idea or the means to a good grade, we must contextualize our teaching within the issues most prevalent in our students' minds.

Restricted access

Nicole M. Wessman-Enzinger and Kristina M. Hofer

This article highlights the importance of re-defining units unconventionally with fractions. We provide three examples of tasks Grade 5 students engaged in; we highlight the creative ways that they flexibly re-defined units and engaged deeply with fractions. We offer suggestions for supporting unconventional units for promoting conceptual understanding of fractions.

Restricted access

Susie Katt and Megan Korponic

Problems to Ponder provides 28 varied, classroom-ready mathematics problems that collectively span PK-12, arranged in order of grade level. Answers to the problems are available online.

Restricted access

Allyson Hallman-Thrasher and Denise A. Spangler

We share ideas for preparing for and enacting high-cognitive demand tasks in ways that support students in articulating and justifying their ideas. We offer strategies for developing and posing several types of purposeful questions: (1) eliciting thinking, (2) generating ideas, (3) clarifying explanations, and (4) justifying claims.

Restricted access

Natalie L. F. Hobson

A quilt design repeating the use of Pythagoras's Theorem provides a variety of questions we can begin to ponder.

Restricted access

Shelli Casler-Failing

This article shares the learning experienced by my seventh-grade students during a lesson incorporating LEGO robotics into my mathematics class. I provide evidence of my students' learning, which represents how LEGO robotics can benefit students in the mathematics classroom to support engagement and development of understanding.

Restricted access

Zalman Usiskin

This article briefly describes the timing of the first concentrated study of algebra over the 100 years of NCTM, from a 9th-grade course taken by only about 1/5 of students to a course taken by virtually all students, with almost half taking it in 8th grade.

Restricted access

Randall E. Groth, Jennifer A. Bergner, Jathan W. Austin, Claudia R. Burgess and Veera Holdai

Undergraduate research is increasingly prevalent in many fields of study, but it is not yet widespread in mathematics education. We argue that expanding undergraduate research opportunities in mathematics education would be beneficial to the field. Such opportunities can be impactful as either extracurricular or course-embedded experiences. To help readers envision directions for undergraduate research experiences in mathematics education with prospective teachers, we describe a model built on a design-based research paradigm. The model engages pairs of prospective teachers in working with faculty mentors to design instructional sequences and test the extent to which they support children’s learning. Undergraduates learn about the nature of systematic mathematics education research and how careful analyses of classroom data can guide practice. Mentors gain opportunities to pursue their personal research interests while guiding undergraduate pairs. We explain how implementing the core cycle of the model, whether on a small or large scale, can help teachers make instructional decisions that are based on rich, qualitative classroom data.

Restricted access

Robyn Ruttenberg-Rozen

Mathematical paradoxes often produce awe and wonder in the mathematics classroom. In this classroom episode, I share a paradoxical task, based on Simpson's Paradox, and its power as an intervention for a child diagnosed with ADHD. The Paradox leveraged his strengths to help him build understandings in proportional reasoning.