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Mary E. Pilgrim

A two-part calculus activity uses true-false questions and a descriptive outline designed to promote active learning.

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Aaron Trocki

The advent of dynamic geometry software has changed the way students draw, construct, and measure by using virtual tools instead of or along with physical tools. Use of technology in general and of dynamic geometry in particular has gained traction in mathematics education, as evidenced in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010).

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Agida G. Manizade and Marguerite M. Mason

When calculating the area of a trapezoid, students use a range of problem-solving strategies and measurement concepts.

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Corey Webel

Do you use group work in your mathematics class? What does it look like? What do you expect your students to do when they work together? Have you ever wondered what your students think they are supposed to do?

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Indigo Esmonde and Jennifer M. Langer-Osuna

In this article, mathematics classrooms are conceptualized as heterogeneous spaces in which multiple figured worlds come into contact. The study explores how a group of high school students drew upon several figured worlds as they navigated mathematical discussions. Results highlight 3 major points. First, the students drew on 2 primary figured worlds: a mathematics learning figured world and a figured world of friendship and romance. Both of these figured worlds were racialized and gendered, and were actively constructed and contested by the students. Second, these figured worlds offered resources for 1 African American student, Dawn, to position herself powerfully within classroom hierarchies. Third, these acts of positioning allowed Dawn to engage in mathematical practices such as conjecturing, clarifying ideas, and providing evidence.

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Sarah D. Ledford, Mary L. Garner and Angela L. Teachey

Interesting solutions and ideas emerge when preservice and in-service teachers are asked a traditional algebra question in new ways.