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Lindsay Reiten and Susanne Strachota

A free tool encourages students to engage in the authentic practices of statistics and data analysis.

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Ayanna D. Perry, Emily P. Thrasher and Hollylynne S. Lee

The use of iPads® in the classroom is growing. In the 2013–14 school year, 57 percent of schools planned to invest in iPads (Netop 2013). This investment can benefit mathematics classrooms only if teachers know which apps they can use to help students develop deeper mathematical understanding. Although learning about and developing facility with various apps is valuable for mathematics teachers, the process can be difficult, overwhelming, and time-consuming. To get started, we recommend one app, Dropbox, that can be used to share materials within the classroom setting, and then we suggest three free, easy-to-use mathematics apps: Sketchpad Explorer, Data Analysis, and MathGraph (see the table on p. 711).

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Anderson Norton, Jesse L. M. Wilkins, Michael A. Evans, Kirby Deater-Deckard, Osman Balci and Mido Chang

Explore a new app that allows students to develop a more sophisticated understanding of fractions.

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This department publishes brief news articles, announcements and guest editorials on current mathematics education issues that stimulate the interest of TCM readers and cause them to think about an issue or consider a specific viewpoint about some aspect of mathematics education. This month, help your teachers plan lessons by coaching them to think about activating students' prior knowledge about content, clearly state the lesson goal, facilitate learning new content, and assess students' learning of the day's work.

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Kurt J. Rosenkrantz

Students say some amazing things. Back Talk highlights the learning of one or two students and their approach to solving a math problem or prompt. Each article includes the prompt used to initiate the discussion, a portion of dialogue, student work samples (when applicable) and teacher insights into the mathematical thinking of the students. In this month's episode, a six-year-old rising first grader uses a computer simulation to understand addition and subtraction on the number line.

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Teaching with Technology and iBooks Author

a good idea in a small package

Cindy Parrott and Ken Holvig

iBooks Author, an Apple app, can be used successfully when writing in math class.

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Tyrette Carter and Joseph Walsh

Share news about happenings in the field of elementary school math education, views on matters pertaining to teaching and learning mathematics in the early childhood or elementary school years, and reactions to previously published opinion pieces or articles.

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This department publishes brief news articles, announcements, and guest editorials on current mathematics education issues that stimulate the interest of TCM readers and cause them to think about an issue or consider a specific viewpoint about some aspect of mathematics education.

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Jennifer Suh and Padmanabhan Seshaiyer

Foundational in understanding place value and our decimal number system, this concept is explored through a practiced-based activity designed to develop teachers' technology knowledge for teaching mathematics. The activity focuses on number sense using online applets and various related models and representations.

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Thomas E. Hodges and Elizabeth Conner

Integrating technology into the mathematics classroom means more than just new teaching tools—it is an opportunity to redefine what it means to teach and learn mathematics. Yet deciding when a particular form of technology may be appropriate for a specific mathematics topic can be difficult. Such decisions center on what is commonly being referred to as TPACK (Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge), the intersection of technology, pedagogy, and content (Niess 2005). Making decisions about technology use influences not only students' conceptual and procedural understandings of mathematics content but also the ways in which students think about and identify with the subject.