Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 34 items for :

  • Grade(s) or Audience x
  • Other Topic x
  • Problem Solving x
  • Reasoning/Sense Making/Proof x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Alexandra Martinez

This department provides a space for current and past PK–12 teachers of mathematics to connect with other teachers of mathematics through their stories that lend personal and professional support.

Restricted access

José N. Contreras

Sequences are an important topic—not only in mathematics but also in the mathematics curriculum. Exploring sequences related to medial triangles offers learners opportunities to solve problems involving sequences within geometric contexts. Sequences related to medial triangles are also a rich source of beautiful and interesting geometric patterns that can be discovered with the use of dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as GeoGebra or Web Sketchpad. In addition, exploring sequences with DGS allows learners to formulate and test conjectures, an important mathematical process. In this article, I describe how my students used GeoGebra and geometric reasoning to visualize, discover, formulate,

Restricted access

Linda L. Cooper

Growing Problem Solvers provides four original, related, classroom-ready mathematical tasks, one for each grade band. Together, these tasks illustrate the trajectory of learners’ growth as problem solvers across their years of school mathematics.

Restricted access

Deanna Pecaski McLennan

For the Love of Mathematics

Restricted access

May 2020 For the Love of Mathematics Jokes

Restricted access

Anna F. DeJarnette, Sahid L. Rosado Lausell, and Gloriana González

Turn a typical geometry problem into a great task that promotes students' reasoning and sense making.

Restricted access

Stephanie M. Butman

Research on students' learning has made it clear that learning happens through an interaction with others and through communication. In the classroom, the more students talk and discuss their ideas, the more they learn. However, within a one-hour period, it is hard to give everyone an equal opportunity to talk and share their ideas. Organizing students in groups distributes classroom talk more widely and equitably (Cohen and Lotan 1997).

Restricted access

Wayne Nirode

Using technology to solve triangle construction problems, students apply their knowledge of points of concurrency, coordinate geometry, and transformational geometry.

Restricted access

Chris Harrow and Lillian Chin

Exploration, innovation, proof: For students, teachers, and others who are curious, keeping your mind open and ready to investigate unusual or unexpected properties will always lead to learning something new. Technology can further this process, allowing various behaviors to be analyzed that were previously memorized or poorly understood. This article shares the adventure of one such discovery of exploration, innovation, and proof that was uncovered when a teacher tried to find a smoother way to model conic sections using dynamic technology. When an unexpected pattern regarding the locus of an ellipse's or hyperbola's foci emerged, he pitched the problem to a ninth grader as a challenge, resulting in a marvelous adventure for both teacher and student. Beginning with the evolution of the ideas that led to the discovery of the focal locus and ending with the significant student-written proof and conclusion, we hope to inspire further classroom use of technology to enhance student learning and discovery.

Restricted access

Fred Dillon and Kevin Dykema

This problem ties into the real-life measurement found in the Richter scale.