Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 28,509 items for

  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Luis A. Leyva

This article proposes and employs a framework that characterizes mathematics education as a white, patriarchal space to analyze undergraduate Black women’s narratives of experience in navigating P–16 mathematics education. The framework guided a counter-storytelling analysis that captured variation in Black women’s experiences of within-group tensions—a function of internalized racial-gendered ideologies and normalized structural inequities in mathematics education. Findings revealed variation in Black women’s resilience through coping strategies for managing such within-group tensions. This analysis advances equity-oriented efforts beyond increasing Black women’s representation and retention by challenging the racialized-gendered culture of mathematics. Implications for educational practice and research include ways to disrupt P–16 mathematics education as a white, patriarchal space and broaden within-group solidarity, including Sisterhood among Black women.

Restricted access

Patricio Herbst, Sandra Crespo, Percival G. Matthews, and Erin K. Lichtenstein

Restricted access

Kristy Jacob

Restricted access

Rachel Wiemken, Russasmita Sri Padmi, and Gabriel Matney

Teachers from two countries designed a model-eliciting activity about the global issue of wind energy. They share teaching and student outcomes from a cross-border engagement in the task with students from Indonesia and the United States through synchronous video conference.

Restricted access

Li Sun and Chunlian Jiang

Growing Problem Solvers offers four original, related, classroom-ready mathematical tasks, one for each grade band. Together, these tasks illustrate the trajectory of learners’ growth as problem solvers across their years of school mathematics.

Restricted access

Josephine Derrick and Laurie Cavey

Challenging to learn, proof can be equally challenging to teach. Insights gleaned about students’ conceptions of proof from 10 high school students who completed four proof-related tasks during one-on-one interviews led to a few instructional takeaways for teachers.

Restricted access

Jennifer Ruef

What does it mean to be “good-at-math,” and how is it determined? defined the normative identity of mathematics classrooms as the obligations that students must meet to be considered good-at-math. Obligations are negotiated between teachers and students through series of bids. Normative identities reveal distributions of agency and authority within classrooms, which affect learning opportunities for students. Traditionally, mathematics teachers held the predominance of agency and authority in classrooms. Research supports shifting toward more equitable teaching and learning (e.g., ). Clear examples of enacting and supporting changes are helpful. This article shares how sixth-grade students and their teacher co-constructed good-at-math to invite and obligate students to become active agents in mathematical argumentation.

Restricted access

Michelle Meadows and Joanne Caniglia

Portrayals in popular media offer ways to convey images of the mathematics field as both beautiful and powerful