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Amber G. Candela, Melissa D. Boston, and Juli K. Dixon

We discuss how discourse actions can provide students greater access to high quality mathematics. We define discourse actions as what teachers or students say or do to elicit student contributions about a mathematical idea and generate ongoing discussion around student contributions. We provide rubrics and checklists for readers to use.

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Stephanie M. Butman

Research on students' learning has made it clear that learning happens through an interaction with others and through communication. In the classroom, the more students talk and discuss their ideas, the more they learn. However, within a one-hour period, it is hard to give everyone an equal opportunity to talk and share their ideas. Organizing students in groups distributes classroom talk more widely and equitably (Cohen and Lotan 1997).

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Nancy S. Roberts and Mary P. Truxaw

A classroom teacher discusses ambiguities in mathematics vocabulary and strategies for ELL students in building understanding.

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Bobson Wong and Larisa Bukalov

Parallel geometry tasks with four levels of complexity involve students in writing and understanding proof.

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David A. Yopp

Asked to “fix” a false conjecture, students combine their reasoning and observations about absolute value inequalities, signed numbers, and distance to write true mathematical statements.

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Corey Webel

Do you use group work in your mathematics class? What does it look like? What do you expect your students to do when they work together? Have you ever wondered what your students think they are supposed to do?

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Mark Pinkerton and Kathryn G. Shafer

An action research study focuses on the teaching strategies used to facilitate Problems of the Week.

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Kasi C. Allen

Collaboration in the mathematics classroom contributes to student learning as well as strengthened preparation for twenty-first-century professions. However, facilitating group work with teenage students can prove challenging. Three strategies for success are establishing a supportive classroom culture; structuring groups and tasks; and nurturing the effort.

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Kristen N. Bieda and Jerilynn Lepak

Research explores how to help students build from, instead of building with, examples when justifying mathematical ideas.

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Paul Laumakis

Students bring the real world into the classroom by studying speeding data collected on two Pennsylvania highways.