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Colleen Haberern

Students used a pinch of this (a 3D printer and geometry software) and a cup of that (various volume formulas) to complete a tiered task.

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Stephan Pelikan, Anna F. DeJarnete, and Stephen Phelps

A monthly set of problems is aimed at a variety of ability levels.

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E. Fanny Sosenke and Tala Councilman

A real-world problem about the cost of moving one's household from one city to another.

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Making Squares

little problems with big solutions

Annie Perkins and Pamela J. Wells

To elicit creative student thinking, this open-ended problem asks solvers to measure as many squares as possible using a certain size of cardboard.

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Stephan Pelikan, Anna F. DeJarnette, and Stephen Phelps

A monthly set of problems is aimed at a variety of ability levels.

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Stephan Pelikan, Anna F. DeJarnette, and Stephen Phelps

A monthly set of problems is aimed at a variety of ability levels.

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Stephan Pelikan, Anna F. DeJarnette, and Stephen Phelps

A monthly set of problems is aimed at a variety of ability levels.

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James Metz

Students analyze how many trees are used to produce toilet tissue.

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Stephan Pelikan, Anna F. DeJarnette, and Stephen Phelps

A monthly set of problems is aimed at a variety of ability levels.

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Stephanie M. Butman

Research on students' learning has made it clear that learning happens through an interaction with others and through communication. In the classroom, the more students talk and discuss their ideas, the more they learn. However, within a one-hour period, it is hard to give everyone an equal opportunity to talk and share their ideas. Organizing students in groups distributes classroom talk more widely and equitably (Cohen and Lotan 1997).