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Catherine Tabor

A programming activity helps students give meaning to the abstract concept of slope.

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D. Bruce Jackson

Given two slices of bread—a problem and the answer—students fill in the fixings: their own mathematics reasoning.

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Classroom communities should embrace individuals and foster communication; to this end, the MT Editorial Panel requests submissions on how to capitalize on the strengths that cultural, racial, and linguistic diversity bring to the classroom.

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Nancy S. Roberts and Mary P. Truxaw

A classroom teacher discusses ambiguities in mathematics vocabulary and strategies for ELL students in building understanding.

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Jason Lee O'Roark

After teaching high school mathematics in Maryland for three years, I began teaching sixth-grade mathematics in one of the best school districts in Pennsylvania (according to state test scores) and have been teaching there for the past six years. My high school teaching background led me to differentiate differently from my colleagues. I share my observations of the result of the differences in methodology and my conclusions from those observations, and I offer a plan to implement changes in the way that mathematics is taught.

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Lisa Berger

An analysis of problems from state assessments and other sources helps preservice teachers discover analogous mathematical representations.

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Marion D. Cohen

Studying mathematics-related fiction and poetry helps students develop an appreciation for both mathematics and literature and an understanding of the connection between the two.

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Blake E. Peterson, Douglas L. Corey, Benjamin M. Lewis, and Jared Bukarau

What can American teachers learn about high-quality mathematics instruction from the Japanese teacher education process?

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David W. Stinson

This article shows how equity research in mathematics education can be decentered by reporting the “voices” of mathematically successful African American male students as they recount their experiences with school mathematics, illustrating, in essence, how they negotiated the White male math myth. Using post-structural theory, the concepts discourse, person/identity, and power/agency are reinscribed or redefined. The article also shows that using a post-structural reinscription of these concepts, a more complex analysis of the multiplicitous and fragmented robust mathematics identities of African American male students is possible—an analysis that refutes simple explanations of effort. The article concludes, not with “answers,” but with questions to facilitate dialogue among those who are interested in the mathematics achievement and persistence of African American male students—and equity and justice in the mathematics classroom for all students.

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Na'ilah Suad Nasir and Maxine McKinney de Royston

This article explores how issues of power and identity play out in mathematical practices and offers a perspective on how we might better understand the sociopolitical nature of teaching and learning mathematics. We present data from studies of mathematics teaching and learning in out-of-school settings, offering a sociocultural, then a sociopolitical analysis (attending to race, identity, and power), noting the value of the latter. In doing so, we develop a set of theoretical tools that move us from the sociocultural to the sociopolitical in studies of mathematics teaching and learning.