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Ron Lancaster

Since its inception, the Mathematical Lens column has provided teachers with resources to use with their students to make connections between mathematics and the world around us through the use of photographs. The editors and the dozens of teachers who submitted material for columns have taken all of us on a journey around the world to discover where mathematics lives. These columns have offered teachers a license to do mathematics everywhere and to travel far with their students with a full tank of resources.

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Stephen Phelps

Edited by Anna F. DeJarnette

A monthly set of problems targets a variety of ability levels.

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Sarah A. Roller, Elizabeth P. Cunningham, and Katherine Ariemma Marin

Use photographs as a formative assessment tool.

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Brandy Crowley and Tracy Harper

Welcome to A-town! All the residents of A-town have names that start with the letter A! Could you live here? Join these students as they solve problems around their neighborhood. Remember, math is everywhere.

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Brandy Crowley and Tracy Harper

What is the most exciting day of the school year? Field trip day! Organizing a smooth field trip requires mathematical thinking. After solving these problems, have students create math questions about their own field-trip experiences.

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Michelle L. Meadows and Joanna C. Caniglia

Imagine that you and your language arts colleagues are teaching Edgar Allan Poe's short story, “The Pit and the Pendulum.” This thrilling story takes us to the Inquisition during which a prisoner is surrounded by hungry rats and bound to a table while a large pendulum slowly descends. The prisoner believes that the pendulum is 30-40 feet long and estimates that it should take about 10-12 swings before he is hit, leaving him with about a minute or a minute and a half to escape. Are his estimations correct? If so, will he make it out in time?

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Nicole Bannister and Benjamin J. Sinwell

Our favorite lesson helps geometry students learn to use diagrams for thinking and communicating (Sinclair, Pimm and Skelin 2012) and motivates a discussion about similarity. The lesson connects sidewalk chalk-andstring (C&S) constructions of regular hexagons with a dynamic geometry software (DGS) approach.

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Haiwen Chu and Leslie Hamburger

Five types of engaging peer-interaction structures can support English learners as they make sense of mathematics and explore important mathematical relationships.