Variations in Both-Addends-Unknown Problems

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Early elementary school students are expected to solve twelve distinct types of word problems. A math researcher and two teachers pose a structure for thinking about one problem type that has not been studied as closely as the other eleven.

Contributor Notes

Currently on a two-year leave of absence from Duval County Public Schools, Zachary M. Champagne, zchampagne@lsi.fsu.edu, is an assistant in research with the Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (FCR-STEM) at Florida State University. He previously taught grades 4 and 5 in Jacksonville and received the 2006 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching.

Robert Schoen, rschoen@lsi.fsu.edu, is the associate director at FCR-STEM. His research interests include student thinking in math, the mathematical education of teachers, and evaluating the effectiveness of educational interventions.

Claire M. Riddell, claire.riddelle@stjohns.k12.fl.us, a former K–grade 1 teacher, is currently an instructional coach in St. Augustine. She creates and facilitates professional development for elementary school teachers and currently serves on the board of the Florida Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

(Corresponding author is Champagne zchampagne@lsi.fsu.edu)(Corresponding author is Schoen rschoen@lsi.fsu.edu)(Corresponding author is Riddell claire.riddelle@stjohns.k12.fl.us)
Teaching Children Mathematics

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