Addressing the Hammer-and-Nail Phenomenon

The hammer-and-nail phenomenon highlights human tendency to approach a problem using a tool with which one is familiar instead of analyzing the problem. Pedagogical suggestions are offered to help students minimize their mathematical impulsivity, cultivate an analytic disposition, and develop conceptual understanding.

Supplementary Materials

    • Appendix 1 (PDF 698 KB)
    • Appendix 2 (PDF 912 KB)
    • Appendix 3 (PDF 359 KB)

Footnotes

Our human tendency is to approach a problem using a familiar tool instead of analyzing the problem. Here are pedagogical suggestions to help students minimize their mathematical impulsivity, cultivate an analytic disposition, and develop conceptual understanding.

Mathematics Teacher: Learning and Teaching PK-12
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