Purposeful Questioning with High Cognitive–Demand Tasks

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  • 1 Ohio University in Athens, Ohio
  • 2 University of Georgia

We share ideas for preparing for and enacting high-cognitive demand tasks in ways that support students in articulating and justifying their ideas. We offer strategies for developing and posing several types of purposeful questions: (1) eliciting thinking, (2) generating ideas, (3) clarifying explanations, and (4) justifying claims.

Supplementary Materials

    • Appendix 1 (PDF 186 KB)
    • Appendix 2 (PDF 187 KB)

Footnotes

Two planning tools as well as examples from preservice teachers show how to support students in articulating and justifying their ideas.

Mathematics Teacher: Learning and Teaching PK-12
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