Preservice mathematics teachers are entrusted with developing their future students' interest in and ability to do mathematics effectively. Various policy documents place an importance on being able to reason about and prove mathematical claims. However, it is not enough for these preservice teachers, and their future students, to have a narrow focus on only one type of proof (demonstration proof), as opposed to other forms of proof, such as generic example proofs or pictorial proofs. This article examines the effectiveness of a course on reasoning and proving on preservice teachers' awareness of and abilities to recognize and construct generic example proofs. The findings support assertions that such a course can and does change preservice teachers' capability with generic example proofs.

Contributor Notes

Shiv Karunakaran, The Pennsylvania State University, The Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence, 301 Rider Building, University Park, PA 16802; suk182@psu.edu, (814) 865-8681

Ben Freeburn, The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, 270 Chambers Building, University Park, PA 16802; byf5045@psu.edu, (814) 863-1691

Nursen Konuk, The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, 270 Chambers Building, University Park, PA 16802; nuk141@psu.edu, (814) 441-3342

Fran Arbaugh, The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, 269 Chambers Building, University Park, PA 16802; arbaugh@psu.edu, (814) 865-6321

(Corresponding author is Karunakaran suk182@psu.edu)(Corresponding author is Freeburn byf5045@psu.edu)(Corresponding author is Konuk nuk141@psu.edu)(Corresponding author is Arbaugh arbaugh@psu.edu)
Mathematics Teacher Educator

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