Connecting Research to Teaching: Not All Opportunities to Prove Are the Same

For many American students, high school geometry provides their only focused experience in writing proofs (Herbst 2002), and proof is often viewed as the application of recently learned theorems rather than a means of establishing and understanding the truth of general results (Soucy McCrone and Martin 2009).

Footnotes

Edited by Margaret Kinzel,mkinzel@boisestate.edu Boise State University, Boise, ID

Laurie Cavey,lauriecavey@boisestate.edu Boise State University, Boise, ID

Contributor Notes

Nicholas J. Gilbertson, gilbe197@msu.edu, is a Ph.D. candidate in mathematics education at Michigan State University in East Lansing. He is interested in classroom discussions, curriculum, and teacher development.

Samuel Otten, ottensa@missouri.edu, is an assistant professor of mathematics education at the University of Missouri in Columbia. He is interested in secondary school students' participation in classroom discourse and mathematical practices.

Lorraine M. Males, lmales2@unl.edu, is an assistant professor of secondary school mathematics education at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. She is interested in teacher development and the development, analysis, and use of curriculum materials.

D. Lee Clark, clarkd40@msu.edu, is a Ph.D. candidate in mathematics education at Michigan State University. He is interested in the making of and communication regarding policy in mathematics education.

(Corresponding author is Gilbertson gilbe197@msu.edu)(Corresponding author is Otten ottensa@missouri.edu)(Corresponding author is Males lmales2@unl.edu)(Corresponding author is Clark clarkd40@msu.edu)
The Mathematics Teacher

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