Bayes's theorem is notorious for being a difficult topic to learn and to teach. Problems involving Bayes's theorem (either implicitly or explicitly) generally involve calculations based on two or more given probabilities and their complements. Further, a correct solution depends on students' ability to interpret the problem correctly. Shaughnessy (1992) has commented, “There is a good deal of cognitive strain involved in reading the problem and keeping everything straight; it is difficult for students to interpret exactly what they are being asked to do” (p. 471).

Contributor Notes

Todd D. Cadwalladerolsker, tcadwall@fullerton.edu, is an assistant professor at California State University at Fullerton. He is interested in students' understanding of proof, probability, and statistics. MONICA CADWALLADEROLSKER

(Corresponding author is Cadwalladerolsker tcadwall@fullerton.edu)
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