A Call for a Critical–Historical Framework in Addressing the Mathematical Experiences of Black Teachers and Students

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  • 1 Vanderbilt University
  • | 2 George Mason University

The purpose of this commentary is to acknowledge, illuminate, and counter the noticeable silences in the investigations of mathematics education researchers who conduct equity research with Black communities and other marginalized groups. For far too long, these communities have experienced a lengthy and complicated history of structural barriers; epistemological, symbolic, and intellectual violence; dehumanization; and antiblackness in mathematics education research. We advance the Critical–Historical (CritHistory) framework, which is rooted in critical race theory (CRT) and further explicates CRT’s tenet of challenging ahistoricism. We discuss methodologies and implications, including example questions that could be posed, types and locations of archives that could be examined, and populations with whom oral histories could be conducted.

Footnotes

The guest editor for this commentary was Edward A. Silver.

Contributor Notes

Nicole M. Joseph, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203; nicole.m.joseph@vanderbilt.edu

Toya Jones Frank, College of Education and Human Development, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, 2403 Thompson Hall, MS 1E8, Fairfax, VA 22030; tfrank4@gmu.edu

Taqiyyah Y. Elliott, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203; taqiyyah.elliott@vanderbilt.edu

Journal for Research in Mathematics Education
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