Maximizing the Quality of Learning Opportunities for Every Student

Footnotes

This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1941494. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Journal for Research in Mathematics Education
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